COVID-19 Niagara Dermatology Notice/What you need to know. COVID-19

    ACNE

    Acne is an inflammatory condition of hair follicles that is prompted by occlusion (clogging) of pores.  Treatments are thus directed at opening the pores and controlling the inflammation.  Acne is stimulated at puberty when increased oil production occurs under hormonal influence (particularly androgens such as testosterone).  Oil leads to occlusion and is a source of nutrients for bacteria that live on the skin.  When the bacteria feed on the oil they break it down into factors that cause inflammatory cells to migrate into the follicle.  Understanding these processes will help you understand the basics of acne treatment. 

    Treatments for follicular occlusion (clogged pores).  Follicular occlusion leads to whiteheads and blackheads.  Factors affecting this include oil production and a build up of dead skin cells around the opening of the follicle (the pore).  Treatments include keratolytics that break up these dead skin cells such as the common over-the-counter treatments benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid, and glycolyic acid.  Treatments that break up oil include various cleansers.  The gold standard for treating follicular occlusion are the Vitamin A-derived topicals called retinoids.  Retinoids both decrease oil production and decrease the stickiness of dead skin cells around the pore.  Retinoids can be either over-the-counter topicals such as adapalene 0.1% or prescription topicals such as higher strength adapalene, tretinoin or tazarotene.

    Treatments for inflammation.  Anti-inflammatory strategies include antibiotics to decrease bacterial presence on the skin as well as products that work directly to inhibit inflammatory pathways.  Antibiotic therapies include many topicals such as the facial cleansers as well as benzoyl peroxide; prescription topical antibiotics include clindamycin, erythromycin, and azelaic acid.  Products that inhibit inflammation directly include the prescription topical dapsone.  When inflammation is severe, oral antibiotics are often considered.  The most common class of oral antibiotics is the tetracycline family which includes doxycycline and minocycline; tetracyclines are both anti-bacterial and have an ability to inhibit inflammatory pathways directly.

    Severe cases of acne: In cases in which the standard therapies have failed to control the severest form of acne (nodulocystic), isotretinoin, an oral retinoid commonly known by its previous brand name Accutane, can be considered.  Because of the many potential side effects of this medication, this drug should only be prescribed by the professionals in a dermatology office.

    Other strategies:

    spironolactone and certain oral contraceptives (OCPs) for women:  these reduce levels of pro-acne testosterone; these agents are particularly helpful for women who have acne in the beard area and who have pre-menstrual flares

    photodynamic therapy (PDT) (Blu-U): PDT can decrease oil production in the skin and appears to kill bacteria as well; it is used for moderate to severe acne

    As always, you can contact our office to answer any questions or concerns.

    Head lice are small parasitic insects that thrive in human hair by feeding on tiny amounts of blood from the scalp. An estimated six to 12 million infestations occur in the U.S. annually. It is particularly common among pre-school and elementary school children. Head lice do not transmit any diseases, but they are very contagious and can be very itchy. They are characterized by the combination of small red bumps and tiny white specks (also known as eggs or nits) on the bottom of hair closest to the skin (less than a quarter-inch from the scalp).

    Head lice are visible to the naked eye. The eggs look like yellow, tan or brown dots on a hair. Live lice can also be seen crawling on the scalp. When eggs hatch, they become nymphs (baby lice). Nymphs grow to adult lice within one or two weeks of hatching. An adult louse is about the size of a sesame seed. Lice feed on blood from the scalp several times a day. They can also survive up to two days off of the scalp.

    Head lice are spread through head-to-head contact; by sharing clothing, linens, combs, brushes, hats and other personal products; or by lying on upholstered furniture or beds of an infested person. You can determine if your child has head lice by parting the child's hair and looking for nits or lice, particularly around the ears and nape of the neck. If one member of your family is diagnosed with head lice, you'll need to check on every member of the same household.

    Medicated lice treatments include shampoos, cream rinses and lotions that kill the lice. Many of these are over-the-counter, but prescription drugs are available for more severe cases. It is important to use these medications exactly as instructed and for the full course of treatment to eliminate the lice. Do not use a cream rinse, conditioner or combined shampoo and conditioner on your hair before a lice treatment. You also should not shampoo for one or two days following the application of a treatment. After applying the medicated treatment, use a special comb to comb out any nits on the scalp. Repeat the entire treatment seven to ten days after the initial treatment to take care of any newly hatched lice. Please note that you should not treat a person more than three times with any individual lice medication.

    To get rid of the lice, you'll also have to:

    • Wash all bed linens and clothing warm by the infested person in very hot water.
    • Dry clean clothing that is not machine washable.
    • Vacuum upholstery in your home and car.
    • Any items, such as stuffed toys, that can't be machine-washed can be placed in an airtight bag and stored away for two weeks. Lice cannot survive this long without feeding.
    • Soak combs, brushes, headbands and other hair accessories in rubbing alcohol or medicated shampoo for at least one hour or throw them away.

    If your child still has head lice after two weeks with over-the-counter medicated products, contact your dermatologist for more effective treatment.


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    Lewiston, NY 14092 (Main office)